Past CFPs

Christianity and Literature Study Group Annual Conference, Toronto 2017

Organizers: Deborah Bowen (Redeemer) and Katherine Quinsey (Windsor)

The Christianity and Literature Study Group invites proposals for papers and sessions on any aspect of Christianity and literature for its annual Conference at the 2017 Congress in Toronto. We welcome a range of critical approaches and topics, including pedagogy and creative writing. In addition to poetry and fiction, papers and sessions this year might consider fantasy or theatre or multimedia genres. We would also welcome topics inspired by the centenary of Vimy Ridge and the 150th anniversary of Confederation, such as a session on war, trauma, and healing, or the role Christianity has played in the development of Canadian Literature. We are also featuring a roundtable on pedagogy (see below).

Paper Proposals

Following the guidelines on the ACCUTE website, paper proposers should send a 300-500 word proposal (with no identifying marks), a 100 word abstract, a 50 word biographical statement, and the submitter information form, to dcbowen@redeemer.ca or to kateq@uwindsor.ca no later than 18 November 2016. Proposal submission forms will be available on the ACCUTE website. All CLSG proposals are sent to a minimum of two readers on a blind referee basis, and acceptance is confirmed usually by mid-January.

Member-organized panels (see below)

This year our joint panel with ACCUTE is on the topic of War, Trauma, and Healing; a full description appears below. Also to be found below are member-organized sessions on the topic of Word and Spirit, organized by Irene Grace Bom (Queen’s University) and our pedagogical roundtable, “The Unteachable Text,” organized by Tina Trigg (The King’s University). Proposals for these panels should be sent to the organizers no later than 18 November 2016. Please note that if you are sending in a proposal for the Pedagogy Roundtable you are still eligible to propose a full paper for another of our sessions or for the general CLSG pool!

Note: In order to present a paper at the CLSG meeting, you must be a member in good standing of ACCUTE as well as of the CLSG.

Proposals for papers in the general pool should be sent to either Deborah or Katherine at the addresses or emails below:

Deborah Bowen
Department of English
Redeemer University College
777 Garner Road E.
Ancaster, ON L9K 1J4
dcbowen@redeemer.ca

Katherine Quinsey
Department of English
University of Windsor
Windsor, ON N9B 3P4
kateq@uwindsor.ca

Spiritual Warfare in C.S. Lewis’s Cosmic Trilogy

Sponsor: Inklings Institute of Canada
Organizer: Greg Maillet

In response to this year’s ACCUTE theme, the Inklings Institute of Canada calls for papers related to the theme of spiritual warfare in the Cosmic Trilogy of C.S. Lewis. Out of the Silent Planet, Perelandra, and That Hideous Strength all deal with this theme in multiple ways, each displaying aspects of what Lewis scholar Jerry Roots calls “the surprising imagination” of C.S. Lewis. This panel will explore how Lewis imaginatively portrays spiritual warfare, one of the common topics in his non-fiction, and in particular how the varied landscapes and motifs of the Cosmic Trilogy allow readers to gain new insights into this complex theme.

Panel organizer:
Greg Maillet
Greg.Maillet@crandallu.ca

Please send paper proposals, including a 300-500 word proposal (with no identifying marks), a 100 word abstract, a 50 word biographical statement, and the submitter information form, to the panel organizer no later than 18 November 2016. Proposal submission forms are available on the ACCUTE website at https://accute.ca/accute-conference/general-call-submission-form/.

Word and Spirit

Organizer: Irene Grace Bom (Queen’s University)

The coming of the Spirit at Pentecost gave believers new powers of speech as well as the revelation of “things to come” (John 16:13). Yet theologians since Augustine have tended to position believers as readers and interpreters (primarily of Scripture) rather than as speakers and writers. How can literary writing facilitate the work of the Spirit? Papers might consider the following:

  • relationships between literary writing and the performative speech of miracles
  • ways in which God’s message of grace – as that which supersedes human knowledge – matches the indirect discourses of literature
  • historical studies of the conflicted relationship between studies of the Word and studies of literature
  • ways in which creative writing has been considered inspired by the Spirit
  • ways in which God’s embodiment of truth – both in the person of Jesus Christ and in physical manifestations of the Spirit – makes representation one with life
  • studies of the debates surrounding “plain speech,” demonstrations of the Spirit, and God’s hidden wisdom (sophian en mysterio, 1 Corinthians 2:7)
  • models of writing, reading, and teaching literature that cultivate seeing and hearing in the Spirit

Paper proposers should send a 300-500 word proposal (with no identifying marks), a 100 word abstract, a 50 word biographical statement, and the submitter information form to irene.bom@queensu.ca no later than 18 November 2016.

War, Trauma, and Healing

Jointly sponsored panel, Association of Canadian College and University Teachers of English (ACCUTE), Christianity and Literature Study Group

Organizers: Tina Trigg (The King’s University), Katherine Quinsey (University of Windsor)

The centenary of the battle of Vimy Ridge in World War I and the sesquicentennial of Canadian Confederation are significant historical events in 2017, providing an opportunity to reflect critically upon the daily reality of war in an ever-shrinking world. In the light of these anniversaries, this panel welcomes papers on the image, idea, and reality of war, the trauma it produces, and the possibility of healing, specifically as enacted through creative textual expression in multiple forms and genres. Papers could address the idea, metaphor, and reality of war as engaged by texts: its intersection of spiritual and physical, of idealized principle and economic and political imperatives; the meaning and impact of orchestrated violence; or different forms of and purposes for warfare, both literal and metaphorical, physical, moral, and spiritual. They could focus on war-related trauma and responses to it through narrative fiction, poetry, performance, or cross-media genres, considering how and whether writing and text operate as emotional, spiritual, moral agents in the process of healing, in either a communal or an individual context. They can consider the role of religious faith in this context as represented, interrogated, explored, or expressed through the texts under consideration, in which the material and the spiritual meet in textual and emotional terms. Papers on Canadian literature are welcome, but the panel encourages a trans-national perspective if possible.

Paper proposers should send a 300-500 word proposal (with no identifying marks), a 100 word abstract, a 50 word biographical statement, and the submitter information form, to one or both of the panel organizers no later than 18 November 2016.

Organizers:

Tina Trigg
The King’s University
9125 – 50 Street
Edmonton, AB T6B 2H3
Tina.Trigg@kingsu.ca

Katherine Quinsey
Department of English
University of Windsor
Windsor, ON N9B 3P4
kateq@uwindsor.ca

Pedagogical Roundtable: The “Unteachable” Text

This roundtable seeks several brief presentations centering around the topic of the “unteachable” text – that is, any literary text from any period/genre that becomes problematic in the classroom setting. The text’s contentious nature may be predictable or have arisen unexpectedly; the roundtable seeks to explore a wide range of responses in order to prompt discussion.

Contributions may address concepts including, but not limited to:

  • What constitutes an “unteachable” text?
  • How do we deal with such texts practically? (Best practices and anecdotes welcome)
  • How does the incidence of the “unteachable” text inform our pedagogical choices/practices?
  • How might an encounter with the “unteachable” text link to student faith development/outcomes?
  • How do textual choices and trigger words/issues intersect?
  • How might an “unteachable” text affect classroom rapport, vulnerability, risk-tasking?
  • How does the institutional context affect “teachability” of material/student-receptiveness?

Please send proposals for a 5-10 minute presentation to Organizer and Chair by 18 November 2016: Tina Trigg, King’s University (tina.trigg@kingsu.ca).

Click here to view previous calls for papers.

George MacDonald & the Cambridge Apostles: Literature, Theology, the Arts, and Social Reform in Victorian England

Trinity Hall, Cambridge

20-22nd July 2016

The George MacDonald Society has decided to re-open its CFP for 5-8 additional 20minute session papers at its July 20-22, 2016 conference in Cambridge. The theme of the conference is “George MacDonald & the Cambridge Apostles,” and we have an incredible keynote lineup to discuss this highly influential and interdisciplinary group, members of which had significant impact upon British Theology & Literature —  speakers include Elisabeth Jay, Timothy Larsen, Stephen Prickett, Trevor Hart, and Kerry Dearborn. Please see http://www.george-macdonald.com/macdonaldsociety/conference2016.html  for further details, or contact  gmsociety.papers@gmail.com. Registration for attendees is also now open.

CLSG Annual Meeting, Calgary 2016

Deadline for proposals: November 9, 2015

Organizers: Deborah Bowen (Redeemer) and Katherine Quinsey (Windsor)

The Christianity and Literature Study Group (an Allied Association now in its 29th year) invites proposals for papers on any aspect of religion and literature, including pedagogy and critical theory, for its annual Conference at the 2016 Congress in Calgary. The deadline for all paper proposals, including those for member-organized sessions, is November 9th.

Following the guidelines on the ACCUTE website, proposers should send a 300-500 word proposal (with no identifying marks), a 100 word abstract, a 50 word biographical statement, and the submitter information form, to dcbowen@redeemer.ca or to kateq@uwindsor.ca no later than 9 November 2015. Proposal guidelines and submission forms will be available on the ACCUTE website once their own call for papers comes out in September. All CLSG proposals are sent to a minimum of two readers on a blind referee basis, and acceptance is confirmed usually by mid-January.

Note: In order to present a paper at the CLSG meeting, you must be a member in good standing of ACCUTE.

Proposals for papers should be sent to either Deborah or Katherine at the addresses or emails below. Proposed submissions to member-organized sessions should be sent to the session organizer (see below).

Deborah Bowen
Department of English
Redeemer University College
777 Garner Road East
Ancaster, ON L9K 1J4
Fax: (905) 648-2134
dcbowen@redeemer.ca

Katherine Quinsey
Department of English
University of Windsor
401 Sunset
Windsor, ON N9B 3P4
Fax: (519) 971-3676kateq@uwindsor.ca

Member-Organized Sessions

Submissions are welcome for the following member-organised sessions. All proposals must follow the ACCUTE guidelines as outlined above, and should be submitted by November 9th.

Rereading C.S. Lewis’s The Chronicles of Narnia for the 21st century

(Joint Session with ACCUTE – please note ACCUTE deadline of November 1)

This session on C.S. Lewis’s Chronicles of Narnia marks the 60th anniversary of its complete publication (1950-1956). Public awareness of the Chronicles continues to grow, also through film adaptations, the stories garnering both praise and criticism. How do we regard the Chronicles in the 21st century? What is their impact on culture, for example, in the areas of philosophy, theology, science, politics, social justice, gender studies, ecology, and education? We are interested in a wide range of theoretical and cross- or multi-disciplinary approaches. Papers may address a single novel or examine several from the series.

Session organizers: Monika Hilder and Stephen Dunning, Co-directors, Inklings Institute of Canada
Monika.Hilder@twu.ca; Stephen.Dunning@twu.ca

Probing the Possibilities and Limits of Hopeful Reading

In the Autumn 2011 issue of Christianity and Literature, Tiffany Eberle Kriner proposed linking a Christian theology of hope to the discipline of English literature. She writes: “rather than considering texts solely as purveyors of hope or possibility for a reader’s future, hopeful reading asks critics to non-instrumentally found their reading on the possibilities in a text’s (or author’s) future” (103). This panel seeks to flesh out Kriner’s notion of hopeful reading both in its theoretical framework and in its practical application to individual literary texts or genres. Key questions for the panel might include: what does it mean to practice hopeful reading, particularly in a moment marked by apocalypse, crisis, and collapse? How might hopeful reading provide reading communities with practical tools to engage the world they live in? Would a hopeful reading practice counteract some of the destructive or reductive tendencies in current literary criticism?

Session organizer: Matthew Zantingh
mzantingh@briercrest.ca

The Word and Words

This session invites papers on the topic of the understanding of the relationship between the revelation of Christ as the Word of God and human words. Perhaps we might start with the proposition that the revelation of Christ as Word instils confidence in authors who accept it that their own activity in working with language is somehow, and irreducibly, meaningful. Papers might focus on theological and theoretical issues or on one or more specific works of literature written in any era. (It is assumed that literary works chosen for analysis will probably be written in English, but this is not absolutely required.) Of particular interest are the notions of authors as theologians (one thinks of a study like Alison Milbank’s Chesterton and Tolkien as Theologians) and of “theology through the arts” with reference to the session’s theme.

Session organizer: Deborah Bowen
dcbowen@redeemer.ca

Roundtable on Pedagogy

The First-Year Challenge: Teaching Christian Reading

This roundtable seeks to explore the particular pedagogical challenge of teaching Christian reading to first-year students. Ideally, presenters will link classroom experience to relevant scholarship and will raise points for conversation. Questions to consider include but are not limited to:

  • What does “Christian reading” mean? How do we teach it?
  • What are some challenges presented by first-year classes?
  • Do current first-year students “read” well? How does contemporary culture enable / limit that ability?
  • How do we handle a student’s moral opposition to and/or refusal to read a particular text? What are the implications of this encounter?
  • What are some of the helpful / harmful assumptions that students bring to literary studies in faith-based institutions? in public institutions?

NOTE: Presenters will be given ten minutes each followed by substantial discussion.

Session organizer: Tina Trigg
tina.trigg@kingsu.ca

The Hermeneutics of Hell: Devilish Visions and Visions of the Devil in World Literature

Deadline for abstracts: September 1, 2015

“There are two equal and opposite errors into which our race can fall about the devils. One is to disbelieve in their existence. The other is to believe, and to feel an excessive and unhealthy interest in them. They themselves are equally pleased by both errors, and hail a materialist or magician with the same delight.”  C. S. Lewis,  The Screwtape Letters

For centuries, the biblical account of Satan has inspired countless authors worldwide. Medieval texts dealing with devils often combined biblical and pagan imageries. But it wasn’t until the early Baroque era when the devil in world literature became more individualistic. Since then, authors from around the world have been drawn to the devil as a literary figure. Often times, the devils created by Milton, Goethe, Chateaubriand, Byron, Lermontov, Strindberg, C.S. Lewis, Mahfouz and many others differ significantly from biblical texts and the literal interpretation of the Satan in the Old Testament. Even though the topic of hell seems to have lost its appeal on pulpits, it is still alive and well in literature.

This collection of essays aims to analyze devilish visions and visions of the devil and the different roles devils have assumed in world literature. What makes devils attractive literary figures? What are the functions of the devils? What are the underlying theologies? How do the literary devils differ from biblical images? Why are we as readers still fascinated by literary manifestations of the devil?

Possible topics may include:

  • The devil as tempter
  • The devil as accuser
  • The devil as satirist
  • The devil as cultural critic
  • The devil as God’s counterpart
  • The devil as revolutionist
  • The devil as a tragic figure
  • The devil and damnation
  • The devil and salvation
  • The devil in passion plays
  • Sympathy for the devil
  • The future of devils
  • Hell on earth
  • Visions of hell
  • Eternal damnation vs. extinction

Email your 250 word abstracts by September 1, 2015 to Dan Russ and Gregor Thuswaldner at dkruss47@gmail.com and Gregor.Thuswaldner@gordon.edu. If selected for the essay collection, the finished essays are due by March 15, 2016.

Faith and Teaching: Virtue, Practice, Imagination

Calvin College, October 1-3, 2015

Deadline for proposals: May 12, 2015

Seeing education in terms of virtues (and vices) focuses attention on questions of formation that are easily relegated to the background when we see primarily through a lens of course objectives and outcomes. A focus on virtues also implies attention to the kinds of practices within which they might flourish, and to the possible role of Christian practices as a framing factor. Seeing education in terms of virtues, formation, and practices is itself an act of educational imagination that draws upon the history of Christian imagination regarding the self and its growth and telos.

The Kuyers Institute for Christian Teaching and Learning (www.pedagogy.net) invites paper submissions that explore questions that connect these themes with teaching and learning in the light of faith. Papers are invited from any discipline or area of educational activity. Papers should focus on some aspect of pedagogy; theoretical and historical studies as well as accounts of practice are welcome.

Questions that might be explored include, but are not restricted to, the following:

  • How can a Christian imagination inform the way we construe teaching and learning?
  • How has past Christian imagination contributed to our understanding of teaching and learning?
  • What specific practices might be generated through a Christian (re-)imagining of teaching and learning?
  • How can faith-informed educational practices contribute to learners’ and teachers’ formation?
  • How do teaching and learning practices relate to growth in particular virtues (or vices)?
  • How might these themes play out within the pedagogies of specific disciplines?

Paper proposals of 1-2 pages, including 100-word abstracts‚ should be sent via e-mail to kuyers@calvin.edu no later than May 12, 2015.  Notification of acceptance will be sent by June 10, 2015.  Additional information regarding the conference will be available in the spring at www.pedagogy.net.

Southwest Conference on Christianity and Literature

Belton, Texas: October 1-3, 2015

Deadline for proposals: March 15, 2015

Proposals are invited by March 15th for the 2015 Southwest Conference on Christianity and Literature (SWCCL), hosted by the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor in Belton, Texas on October 1-3. Further details and the full call for papers can be found at http://undergrad.umhb.edu/english/swccl. You must be a member of the Conference on Christianity and Literature (CCL) to participate.

MLA 2016

Austin, Texas: January 7-10 2016

The following CFPs have appeared as part of the Religion and Literature discussion list for the MLA. They are for sessions at the next MLA meeting in Austin, Texas, 7-10 January 2016. Once paper proposals have been accepted by the panel chair, the panel will be sent for final approval to the MLA submission committee.

Chronicles of Narnia at 60
Deadline for proposals: March 2, 2015

Successful panelists will present short critical papers (20 mins; 6 double spaced pages single sided; this is a firm limit) that discuss C. S. Lewis’ Chronicles of Narnia as a whole on the 60th anniversary of the completion of its first complete publication (1950-1956).

Papers must consider at least three of the novels from the series and may consider other adaptations such as films, games, or pop-up books and so forth. Papers that address adaptations may consider a given adaptation as one of the three sources required above. However, whether positively or negatively, papers must address the issue of the coherence of the series as a whole or between the novels and their adaptations.

Papers should not only address the novels/adaptations themselves but also relevant scholarly work as needed by the topic of the essay including not only scholarship about the Chronicles but also theoretical work such as adaptation theory.

To apply, please send 300 word abstracts by 2 March 2015 to Keith Dorwick (kdorwick@louisiana.edu). Include any audiovisual equipment needs for your presentation with your abstract. I will be making my decisions by 9 March 2015, so no late submissions accepted.
Inquiries and questions are welcome at kdorwick@louisiana.edu.

Religion and Early Literature
Deadline for proposals: March 15, 2015

Given the difficulty of distinguishing between literary and religious texts in early periods, how do literary scholars differ in their approaches to early texts from scholars of religious studies? We invite papers on religious literature from the sixth to the seventeenth centuries, from a range of literary disciplines and languages (Old English, Scandinavian, Hebrew, Spanish, Arabic, etc.), exploring questions of approach and practice. Panel sponsored by MLA Forum on Religion and Literature. Abstract/CV by 15 March 2015 to Adrienne Williams Boyarin, aboyarin@uvic.ca.

Pedagogical Approaches to Sacred Texts and Literature
Deadline for proposals: March 15, 2015

Strategies and issues related to teaching sacred texts/selections as literature or literature as religious practice. All religions and periods. Panel sponsored by MLA Forum on Religion and Literature. Abstract/CV by 15 March 2015; Lisa Gordis, lgordis@barnard.edu.

Heavens Above: Envisioning Religion in Science Fiction
Deadline for proposals: March 15, 2015

Alien religions, post-secular numinous experience, evolutionary religious developments, neo-religious epiphanies–science fiction rarely leaves religion behind as it leaps to the stars. Papers addressing teleologies of transcendence, apocalyptic religious fulfillments, and other intersections of religion and science fiction welcome. Panel sponsored by MLA Forum on Religion and Literature. Abstract/CV by 15 March 2015 to Liam Corley, wccorley@cpp.edu.

Sacred Literature, Secular Religion: A Conference on Cultural Practices

LeMoyne College, October 1-3, 2015

Deadline for proposals: March 1, 2015

Following the success of the September 2013 conference and building on its momentum, a second LeMoyne College Religion and Literature Forum conference entitled “Sacred Literature, Secular Religion: A Conference on Cultural Practices” will be held from October 1-3, 2015, with an optional wine tour on October 4.

This conference explores how religious and secular concerns overlap and inform modes of belief and forms of pious (and impious) expression. Rather than approach the sacred and the secular in dualistic terms, the Forum seeks ways of understanding how the categories intersect and criss-cross. Papers are invited which conceptualize and describe the interrelations between religion and literature. Keynote speakers include Amila Buturovic, Amy Hollywood, John Lardas Modern, Cynthia Robinson, and Richard A. Rosengarten.

The conference welcomes diverse ways of framing and pursuing the theme of “sacred literature, secular religion” and encourages contributions from scholars in a diversity of disciplines. Papers from graduate and undergraduate students are also welcome. The deadline for proposals is March 1, 2015.

Please visit the conference website at lemoyne.edu/slsr for further details about the event, submission guidelines, and keynote speakers.

“Burn of Being”: Imagination, Faith, and Art in the Works of Christian Wiman

Abilene Christian University, June 3-5, 2015

Deadline for proposals: January 31, 2015

The 2015 Christian Scholars Conference will feature poet and former editor of Poetry magazine, Christian Wiman, along with Sarah Coakley, Professor of Divinity, Cambridge University, and Tavis Smiley, author and PBS broadcaster. For program details, go to http://www.lipscomb.edu/csc.

A session will focus on the works of Christian Wiman. We invite proposals on a variety of topics, including:

  • Wiman’s craft as a poet;
  • The relationship of his autobiographical writings to his art;
  • His spiritual journey;
  • His vocation;
  • Questions of faith and doubt;
  • The relation of human and divine love;
  • The relation of theology and art;
  • Mysticism;
  • Views of God, suffering, loss, creation, nature;
  • His relationship to other writers, etc.

Presentations may focus on Wiman’s poetry and/or his nonfiction writings.

Send proposals (250-400 words) and queries to Darryl.Tippens@acu.edu by January 31.

Proposals should bear a title, author’s name, email address, and bio note including academic affiliation. Personal information will be removed before proposals go to the peer reviewers who choose the papers. Acceptances go out by February 28. Completed papers are due May 15.

Readings are limited to 15-18 minutes (7-9 double-spaced pages). All the papers will be read before discussion is opened. Sessions last 90 minutes.

Readers must register with the conference to present their papers. Registration and housing information will be posted in spring.

The mission of the CSC is to create and nurture an intellectual and Christian community that joins individuals and institutions to stimulate networks of scholarly dialogue and collaboration. The conference was created in 1981 by Dr. Thomas H. Olbricht, Distinguished Professor Emeritus, Pepperdine University, and has since been hosted by several universities associated with Churches of Christ. The conference calls together scholars from a wide variety of disciplines in the liberal arts, sciences, business, law, education and medicine to develop their own academic research and to reflect on the integration of scholarship and faith.

Christianity and Literature Study Group: Annual Conference, Ottawa 2015

Organizers: Deborah Bowen (Redeemer) and Katherine Quinsey (Winsor)

**EXTENDED DEADLINE FOR PROPOSALS: November 15th, 2014.

The Christianity and Literature Study Group (an Allied Association now in its 28th year) invites proposals for papers on any aspect of religion and literature, including pedagogy and critical theory, for its annual Conference at the 2015 Congress in Ottawa. We also welcome member-organized sessions. A list of currently-proposed sessions is included with this call for papers.

Paper Proposals

Following the guidelines on the ACCUTE website, proposers should send a 300-500 word proposal (with no identifying marks), a 100 word abstract, a 50 word biographical statement, and the submitter information form, to dcbowen@redeemer.ca or to kateq@uwindsor.ca no later than 15 November 2014. Proposal guidelines and submission forms can be found at http://accute.ca/accute-conference/accute-cfp-jointly-sponsored-sessions/. All CLSG papers are sent to a minimum of two readers on a blind referee basis, and acceptance is confirmed usually by mid-January.

Note: In order to present a paper at the CLSG meeting, you must be a member in good standing of ACCUTE. You should also be aware, however, that presenters at CLSG sessions are not eligible for the ACCUTE conference travel funds provided by SSHRC.

Proposals for papers and/or member-organized sessions should be sent to either Deborah or Katherine at the addresses or emails below. A reminder that the extended deadline for proposals is 15 November.

Deborah Bowen
Department of English
Redeemer University College
777 Garner Road East
Ancaster, ON, L9K 1J4
Fax: (905) 648-2134
dcbowen@redeemer.ca

Katherine Quinsey
Department of English
University of Windsor
401 Sunset
Windsor, ON N9B 3P4
Fax: (519) 971-3676
kateq@uwindsor.ca

CLSG Member-Organized Sessions

Paper proposals due 15 November 2014

New Formalism in Theory and Practice

New Formalism has come to describe a range of literary scholarship that inquires into the relationship between form and context. Disappointed both with the New Critical idealization of form and with the Cultural Materialist neglect of aesthetic categories, New Formalist readers explore the dynamic tension of form and context, the interdependence of a text’s aesthetic and ideological features. While New Formalism may not represent a new “turn” in theory-after-theory, it may prove a useful meeting place for various approaches to literature, including those from a specifically Christian starting point. We invite proposals for 20-minute papers that may consider any aspect of New Formalism, from its philosophical assumptions in theory to its methodology in practice. Please submit proposals and abstracts to Ben Faber, bfaber@redeemer.ca.

The Oxford Inklings

We welcome proposals on C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien, Owen Barfield, and Charles Williams, as well as their mentors George MacDonald, G.K. Chesterton, and friend Dorothy L. Sayers. How did they critique culture in their day through literature – for example, in the areas of science, politics, theology, social justice, education, and the environment – and how might their insights prove potentially transformative for our contemporary world? Fittingly, with the University of Ottawa’s theme for Congress 2015 – the power of ideas – how and why did these authors ignite hearts and minds? What is their invaluable legacy? Please submit proposals and abstracts to Inklings Institute of Canada co-directors Monika.Hilder@twu.ca or Stephen.Dunning@twu.ca.

Hope or Fiction?

Possible joint session with ACCUTE – TBA

Contemporary Canadian literature is besieged by bleakness – or so it would seem. Nonetheless, literature continues to proliferate in our time-deprived society; medical schools are increasingly requiring interns to sign up for courses in fiction, and book clubs abound. Is the popularity of contemporary Canlit suggestive of a hidden hope in fiction, or is such hope a fiction itself? Is reading an act of empathetic engagement or self-gratifying escapism? Is positing literature as a site of hope/empathy reductive or productive for Canadian literary studies in our current milieu? This panel seeks to examine the contemporary social role of Canadian fiction, or to answer the question, why read now? We invite proposals for papers on contemporary Canadian fiction critically engaging with issues including but not limited to:

  • What is the role of emotion in reading fiction?
  • Does fiction (attempt to) offer hope? Where, how, in what, to whom?
  • Does reading fiction enhance empathy?
  • Is language inherently hopeful?
  • Book club communities: why join?
  • Canlit as social capital: value or sell-out?
  • Bibliotherapy

Please send proposals and abstracts to Tina Trigg, tina.trigg@kingsu.ca.

Canadian Centre for Scholarship and the Christian Faith: “The Fine Arts and the Christian Faith”

March 21-22, 2014
Concordia University College of Alberta

DEADLINE FOR PROPOSALS: Friday, February 28th, 2014.

Scholars who want their original unpublished papers for the conference published in our online journal (the Canadian Journal for Scholarship and the Christian Faith) may submit them for adjudication at any time.

Call for Paper and Poster Presentations

Paper and Poster Presentations may be from any of the following sub-disciplines along the theme of The Fine Arts and the Christian Faith: Music, Poetry, Drama, Dance and the Visual Arts including Painting, Sculpture and Graphic Design.

Paper proposals should include an abstract of 150-300 words outlining the topic related to the theme, method and purpose. The paper should be close to 2500 words. The presentation should last around 25 minutes with approximately 5 minutes for question and answer. PowerPoint, DVD and Internet are available for the presentation.
Poster and Artwork proposals should also provide an abstract of 150-300 words outlining the topic related to the theme, method and purpose. Posters and Paintings should be approximately 6 feet long and 4 feet wide. Artwork should attempt to be economical in terms of size for display—and must provide dimensions of the piece of artwork. Presenters are expected to stay with their poster or artwork during the scheduled session in order to field questions and dialogue about the topic of the poster or artwork.
Click here for further guidelines and submissions.

Call for Performance Artists

We are looking for Buskers to play in the hallways of CUCA, Poets to read in the Cafeteria of CUCA, Dancers to perform in the Tegler, Improvisers and Storytellers to perform throughout CUCA. To perform without cost go to our website or contact Bill Anderson for more info at bill.anderson@concordia.ab.ca.

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